Comfort with Money

by Rodney Gibson Financial Advisor

I am a sole practitioner with 40 years experience in finance, taxation, law, business and accounting. I am currently associated with SALA Financial Services. I provide the following:

  • Estate Planning, including wills and powers of attorney (EPOAs)

  • Estate Management

  • Taxation advice

  • Investment advice, including superannuation

  • Business structure advice

 

My aim is to assist you to live within your means and achieve all your financial goals.

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Credit Card Charges

I am not referring to interest. The interest rate charged on credit card debt is disgusting and always has been. The only time I was charged that interest was when a mistake was made and I misunderstood the crediting method used by the banks when payment was made. That was over 40 years ago and I have never repeated the process. What I am complaining about and therefore avoid like the plague, is the "service" charge made by a business to their customer for paying their bill with a credit card. Yes, it does cost the business money, the amount of that charge negotiable with the bank, but what do they get in return? Instant cash Certainty of payment Reduced staff work in collecting, counting an

Divorce

I have been through a divorce. It was not fun. On a couple of occasions in the past I have assisted clients in the process of getting divorced to reduce the trauma but above all to attempt to produce a financial result that was “fair” (in whose mind?) and a separation that was practical. The first client I ever helped was the lady to whom I have now been married for 36 years. Because her husband at the time was a mate of mine (and, in a manner of speaking still is) the question occasionally arises that I could have got a much better deal for her. In my opinion a better deal is not just measured in dollars! When I graduated with an LLB after working as an accountant for almost 30 years, a sol

Points

“Loyalty” programs at their most basic are simply a way of saying, tangibly, “Thank you for shopping with us”. Like the “bakers’ dozen”, which, if you are a cynic, probably started with a baker who couldn’t count, but was more likely a sale gimmick - buy twelve and get one “free”. Setting aside discounts at sales time my first encounter with points accumulation, like most of us, came from a frequent flyer program and after crossing the Pacific several times on business we finally managed to get a “free” flight. On another occasion when trying to get a free flight using “points” we discovered that the ONLY 2 business class seats that could be bought on that plane for that flight had been take

The Hard Working Australian

When I studied English at University one of the lasting imprints on my consciousness, put there by more than one of the lecturers, was the fact that our language, unlike Latin, continues to evolve. What a phrase, expression or even a word that was universally accepted as meaning something in 1948, can mean something quite different in 2018. The word “gay” springs to mind, as does the word “nice”. Nice once meant silly, foolish or simple, far from the complimentary meaning it has now. As a teenager I would have thought that the expression “hard working Australian” had a simple enough meaning. Somehow a particular band of politicians have managed to hijack these words to create an exclusive se